Snowy owls, snowmobile trails and beaver tails

So I think I’ve been in Canada for nearly two weeks now. I am gradually learning things.

For example, when someone talks about getting beaver tails, they actually mean some sort of delicious pastry:

beavertailDEEP FRIED BEAVER!

I also learned how to write some basic video analysis stuff in python, and that a single chickadee in a controlled environment is an easier thing to track than multiple shags on the ocean:vlcsnap-2016-01-23-23h49m11s193I learnt that they deliberately thicken the ice here:

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This is so the canal (which I walk along on the way to the office) can be turned into a massive ice skating rink. It opened for the first time today. I saw many people gliding effortlessly along, as well as some children being dragged along on sleds, which looks more my speed.  Since I got here I have occasionally been asked if I skate, to which I give a rueful laugh. I don’t think me and skates would really mix.

Another thing I learned is that batteries drain very quickly in the cold weather. Today myself and the grad students in my research group went to see if our lab vehicle still worked after sitting in a garage for a month or so. The answer was, it didn’t.

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Battery is flat.

However once a man from the Canadian AA turned up and jump started it, the car had to be driven somewhere to charge the battery. So I got to go on jaunt to one of the field sites where chickadees are studied, alongside a snowmobile trail. This was great as I was keen to get out of the city and see some Canadian countryside, and see some chickadees in the wild.

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We found many chickadees, but also a bald eagle!

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Eeeeeeagle!

Shortly after seeing this I left the trail to go and look at a heap of rusty farm machinery buried in the snow. When I came back to the path, I knew something was afoot. It was then that I learnt that Canadian ambushes are exceptionally polite, as I was warned I might want to put my binoculars away:

12615379_10208372060120941_7821439240601366873_oArg! (Photo by Teri Jones)

It was then decided that we would head back toward Ottawa and try and find some snowy owls that had been reported in the area. On the way we would stop for “Timbits”. I did not know who Tim was, or the answers to any related questions. I found out:

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It seems that Timbits are a big box full of the centres of various doughnuts! These tided us by as we headed toward where we might find snowy owls.

We stopped at the edge of a field in the general area where the owls had been seen. We all climbed out of the car and had a general scan of the trees and hedgerows. Nothing. We got back in the car to try a different spot. This was rather similar to my previous experience of attempting to see specific birds, so I wasn’t overly hopeful about finding a snowy owl in an expanse of snowy fields.

Then Shannon who had been looking out of the moving car with her binoculars (I am fairly certain doing this would make me carsick) suddenly spotted something on an electricity pylon in the middle of a field. We parked as close as we could to have a look. The post was quite a distance from the road, but through our binoculars we could clearly see a snowy owl! I had never even seen an owl in daylight, let alone that clearly.

I tried to get a picture but even at maximum zoom it wasn’t enormously clear.

IMG_2982Owl?

Still, the view through the binoculars was great. We stood and watched the owl for a bit, before deciding to head back down the road to try and find the female that was also supposed to be about. Once again I was sceptical. I think I’d just said finished muttering something along those lines when I suddenly has to ask:

“What’s that on the post?”

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There, on a post right next to the road was another snowy owl. We parked up right next to it, getting a much better view than before. I decided I had to try and take a photo.

It was at this point was once again reminded that batteries drain incredibly fast in the cold. Like the car earlier, my camera refused to start up. I fumbled with the various spare batteries. None of them worked. This was absolutely typical but luckily the owl was fairly accomodating. Eventually through luck and the strategic warming up the batteries, my camera finally fired up:

owl1OWL!

Tomorrow: statistics course!

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